2014.10.08

Awhile ago, a comedian named Louis C.K. had a comedy routine about everything in the world being great and still no one was happy. I’m sure you can look it up on Youtube. I think it’s hilarious. He talks mostly about the huge steps our world has taken forward when it comes to technology, travel, and over all connectedness to human kind. He goes on to comically explain that as a society, we don’t even take a second to appreciate the great step that was just taken until we feel that we are “owed” more. Everything new in life is decreased to unappreciated far too quickly. Change continues to encompass our world, and it’s because we expect it.

 
We only expect it though when we expect that it will in some way better our life. When it comes to changing the church, we respond terrified.

 

 “But won’t that upset the older folks, they don’t like the music that loud…”

“Well yes, that seems to work for the other churches in the area, but it won’t work here because it isn’t how we’ve always done it.”

“Well what we usually do is…”

 

While God is constant in our lives, the ways that we worship Him and the time spent with Him does not have to be constantly the same. New songs, new spaces, new traditions may cause us to encounter God differently, and I can’t express enough that as long as all of these things are theologically sound, that’s OK.  My question is, Why don’t we expect changes in the Church to better our lives?  Like the new iPhone, why aren’t we standing in line all night trusting that the new component to our usual service could be the answer to all of our frustrations. What if this component keeps us “charged” longer? What if we find a new application that we aren’t sure how we lived so long without?

 
I think it’s because we forget the majestic wonder that we have in the creation and connection of Christ. We imagine the worst things happening if we were to dare turn off our phones, but after service on Sunday we can shut it all down until we choose to boot up again.  It’s no wonder that we continually feel as though we haven’t heard from God. We don’t give him much of a window of opportunity to speak.

 
We must begin to expect that change will make us stronger. We must begin to expect that change is possible, and we must begin to expect that it isn’t going to be handed to us. We must begin to expect that change will begin with us, and we have to know that our failures and our successes are in God’s hands. The Church wants its people to live the best life available, and we have to expect that the best life available to live takes place when lived in connection with the Lord. Only in His greatness is everything great, and at the same time, everyone can find happiness.